dmnc

cosas con las que me quiero quedar

The Punk Rock Movie (1978) - trailer

assembled from Super 8 camera footage shot by Don Letts, the disc jockey at The Roxy club during the early days of the UK punk rock movement

Filed under cine

We used to sit down with software and point and click on things; now we carry software around and tap, swipe, pinch and zoom on things. As our computing habits have gotten more mobile and more physical, the metaphor of pages, which implies a more focused, dedicated frame of mind, has become less useful.

Cards offer an alternative metaphor that’s much more complementary to how we use phones and tablets. Just as in the real world, you don’t need to sit down at your desk in order to use cards; you carry them around and whip them out whenever or wherever they can help you—again, think of index, business or credit cards—in context of what you’re already doing (that respect for the user’s current context is important to cards as third-party content, too). Cards just make more sense on mobile than pages.

Khoi Vinh, en su artículo: What is a Card?

Filed under ux metaphor

Is The Man Who Is Tall Happy? (2013)

Documental Animado de Michel Gondry sobre Noam Chomsky.

Dice Gondry en una entrevista en The Notebook: “I don’t know many people on this planet who are competent and exceptional on both scientific and political subjects. Often scientists are very vague on political opinion, and politicians have contempt and zero interest in science. It’s quite amazing to meet someone who is equally a genius in both fields.”

Filed under cine

As with anything, a “Yo” can just be a yo. But you’ll feel a very real difference between a “Yo” you get in the morning from a friend and a “Yo” you get at 2 a.m. from a friend with benefits. Trust me.
Más teorías sobre Yo! y su funcionamiento “por contexto”, En TechCrunch. Conectandolo con Dualismo Digital, Snapchat y Secret.

Filed under internet

Nuestros dedos son demasiado gordos para interactuar con un smartwatch. Y eso presenta una excelente oportunidad para introducir cambios disruptivos en la forma de interactuar.
En este artículo de Wired: http://www.wired.com/2014/05/hardware-hacker-solves-a-big-smartwatch-problem-your-fat-fingers se muestra un concepto diseñado por alumnos de Carnegie Mellon University.

Nuestros dedos son demasiado gordos para interactuar con un smartwatch. Y eso presenta una excelente oportunidad para introducir cambios disruptivos en la forma de interactuar.

En este artículo de Wired: http://www.wired.com/2014/05/hardware-hacker-solves-a-big-smartwatch-problem-your-fat-fingers se muestra un concepto diseñado por alumnos de Carnegie Mellon University.

Filed under UX interaction smartwatch

Let’s face it: nobody likes commuting. The alarm rings earlier, you arrive home that much later. You lose time, patience, possibly even your will to eat anything other than convenience food with plastic utensils. Maybe you skip the gym, miss your child’s bedtime, feel too tired for a meaningful conversation with your significant other. The list goes on.
[…]
But let’s say we ignore the overwhelming evidence that commuting doesn’t do a body good. Pretend it isn’t bad for the environment either. Let’s just do the math. Say you spend thirty minutes driving in rush hour every morning and another fifteen getting to your car and into the office. That’s 1.5 hours a day, 7.5 hours per week, or somewhere between 300 and 400 hours per year, give or take holidays and vacation.

Excerpt From: Remote - Jason Fried.

Otro de los motivos para pensar las posibilidades de hacer trabajo remoto: los traslados diarios como una pérdida de tiempo, salud y dinero.

Si te trasladás 5 días a la semana y trabajás 8hs al día, esas 300 horas representan 37 días laborales perdidos.

Filed under commute remote remoteworking